From North Carolina Personal Injury and Medical Malpractice Attorney Brent Adams: “We Lawyers Are Also Egomaniacs.”

We lawyers are big copycats. It took lawyers twenty years after the Bates decision (which allowed lawyers to advertise) before lawyers began to advertise to any significant degree. Why? It is because we are all copycats.We copied the conduct of the established blue blood, silk-stocking lawyers who (even after the Bates decision) looked down their nose at lawyer advertisers.

Ben Glass teaches us not to be copycats. He teaches us to look around to see what all the other lawyers are doing and to do the opposite. In order to stand out from the crowd, you must be different. Ben teaches us how to stand out and how to do things differently which leads to a better practice, more money, and a better lifestyle. For instance, he notes that you can go to any phone book in any city in our country and look in the phone book to see that lawyer’s ads are all the same. We could substitute the names of the law firms in the various ads and it would make no difference. None of the ads stand out. Ben teaches us how to draft telephone book advertising which stands out and differentiates us from the crowd. He teaches us that our ads do not have to be large to be effective.

We lawyers are also egomaniacs. We think that we have all the answers. Ben teaches us that is wrong. We should look to other industries and professions to see how they do it, what works for them, to see how they make money, and to see how they succeed. Ben teaches us to borrow ideas and methods from other businesses and apply those successful methods to our practice. He has shown us that there are many commonalities that we share with all other busi­nesses and that we can adapt their methods in our practices to make us more successful. It may be true that our law school professors taught us to “think like lawyers.” However, that is not necessarily good. It is more important to “think”. Ben shows us that it is important to think about how other industries succeed and to open our minds to new ideas and methods, to expand our imaginations, and to embrace new methods of thinking.We can all go broke “thinking like a lawyer.”

We lawyers are also great procrastinators. Ben teaches us to “do it now.” Try new things, NOW. Even if it does not work, it is our failures that add to our body of knowledge and help us progress towards the ideas and methods that WILL work. The advantage that we small firm lawyers have over the mega-sized law firms is that we can turn on a dime, abandon the things that do not work, and embrace new things. Ben teaches us to exploit that advantage to the fullest.

We lawyers have a terminal case of tunnel vision. We tend to focus on one area of practice, manner of doing things, habits, and customs and ignore the entire rest of the world. Ben removes the blinders from our eyes and allows us to see the world of law practice and life in general with a wide panoramic view. He teaches us to ask “why”and “why not.” Why can’t wedo things differently? Why is the way we have done things for years the best way? Why can’t we change? Why can’t we be better? Why can’t we have greater income and work less hours?

We lawyers are miserable workaholics. We all tend to be “type A” person­alities driven to achieve. The problem is that, somewhere around the second year of law school, we focus on achieving the wrong things. More cases, more briefs, more deadlines, more trials, more clients... and for what? Ben teaches us to step back, take a look at our lives, and examine what is important. He teaches us that we can have a successful practice without working sixteen hour days. Ben teaches us to focus on what is really important in life and, more importantly, how to find the time to achieve and enjoy those important things. Ben is a master at eliminating time-draining vampires. By doing so, we all have more time to live life the way it should be lived.

Ben’s materials provide a step-by-step guide to completely eliminating (or at least reducing) the five handicaps named above which we lawyers have and which prevent us from having a good quality lifestyle. While Ben will teach you about marketing, you will also learn how to make lifestyle changes which will greatly enhance your life and the lives of your family. Many who teach marketing to lawyers are not lawyers themselves. It is important that Ben is a lawyer. However, Ben is not just another lawyer. He is one of the premiere lawyers in his area of practice. Ben is on the cutting edge of new developments in the legal world and has taught lawyers throughout the country not only marketing techniques, but also new and creative innovations in the success­ful practice of law. It is important that we receive our marketing advice from an accomplished lawyer, not just an advertising man who does not know a tort from a doughnut.

I highly recommend Ben’s toolkit, his seminars, and all of the materials which he generates so prolifically. Do not buy his materials, however, unless you are prepared to live a better life, have a more successful practice, and prudently manage more money than you ever imagined would come to you through your law practice.

Brent Adams | Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice | North Carolina